Kinky Chats with Roni Loren

RoniLorenAuthorPhoto2015 copysmall

NY Times Bestselling author &
Golden Flogger Award Nominee
Roni Loren shares what she thinks
about writing BDSM and more…

 

Why did you begin writing BDSM novels?
It was what I most liked to read, and my favorite authors were writing in that genre, but I was a little scared to jump in at first. I think because I was worried what others (family/friends/etc.) would think. And this was a few years before 50 Shades, so there wasn’t as much mainstream awareness of the genre.

But I’d written a YA romance and a sexy contemporary romance, and I had this idea that wouldn’t leave me alone that required BDSM as part of the plot and romance. So while my contemporary romance was on submission with publishers, I decided—what the hell. I need to write this. No one will probably see it anyway. (I was unpublished at the time.) So I wrote CRASH INTO YOU, the first book in my Loving on the Edge series. Of course, that book that I didn’t think anyone would see ended up being the one that landed me an agent and a book deal, lol. I guess that’s why they tell you to write the ideas you feel passionate about. And I quickly got over the “what will people think” fear. I’m over ten books in now, and my family and friends have been nothing but supportive. My mom even reads all my books and promotes me to her friends. : )

What does being nominated for the Golden Flogger Award mean to you?
I’m very excited and honored to be nominated, particularly because it’s in the female dominant/male submissive category. I had been itching to write that dynamic for a while, but publishers are often a little scared of it because it historically doesn’t sell as well as male dominant stories. So I wrote a few short stories with dominant heroines to test the waters a bit. And after that, my editor, who has been great at letting me color outside the lines, gave me the go ahead to write a longer story and BREAK ME DOWN was born. And it’s been so great to hear the positive response from my readers, especially from those who thought they’d never like a male submissive story.

Do you conduct any advocacy work in this lifestyle or is it strictly fiction base for you? If so, what?
I was a social worker before I was a writer, so advocacy for a number of different groups and causes has always been important to me. And I think that’s actually a big part of why I write fiction. Studies have shown that when we read fiction, we identify with the characters and develop empathy in ways we may not have just looking from the outside in. So all of my books have themes of acceptance (both for self and for others) and the idea that our quirks and differences should be embraced and celebrated, that we all deserve love and happy endings. And nothing makes me happier than when I hear from a reader who says they see things differently now, whether that’s for LGBTQ issues or BDSM or polyamory. Reading about characters humanizes those differences and it stops being an “us/them” mentality.

Where would you like to see the BDSM genre head? How will it get there?
I think it’s constantly evolving and I do worry about readers burning out because the genre has become so popular as of late. But I think there will always be room for well-written, smart erotic books. No matter how long I’ve been reading or writing this genre, I still find new books and authors who knock me on my ass with their talent. So I think as long as we have authors who are doing it right and readers who want more great stories, we’re going to land in a good place.

What is the hardest part of writing your novel?
I’m a pantser (meaning I don’t plot ahead) and I’m character-driven, so I have characters and a premise and then get to writing. Imagine jumping in a car with awesome people you know well and having only a general idea of where you want to go on this road trip. That’s me writing a first draft, lol. So the hardest part of writing for me is nailing down the plot. The characters come to me easily, but the plot shifts around a lot as I write. And there are lots of wrong turns. It’s a process of discovery and seeing where the characters lead. I’ve accepted that it’s my creative process (I’ve tried other ways, believe me!) but it’s a messy process. So I’m usually happiest once the draft is on the page and I can get to the fun part of revising it and turning it into a (hopefully) great story.

Roni wrote her first romance novel at age fifteen when she discovered writing about boys was way easier than actually talking to them. Since then, her flirting skills haven’t improved, but she likes to think her storytelling ability has. After earning a master’s degree in social work from LSU, she worked in a mental health hospital, counseled birthmothers as an adoption coordinator, and did management recruiting in her PJs. But she always returned to writing.

Though she’ll forever be a New Orleans girl at heart, she now lives in Dallas with her husband and son. If she’s not working on her latest sexy story, you can find her cooking, watching reality television, or picking up another hobby she doesn’t need—in other words, procrastinating like a boss. She is a former RITA award nominee and is a New York Times and USA Today bestselling author.


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Kinky Chats with Roni Loren — 1 Comment

  1. Pingback: Newsletter September 17, 2017 | BDSM WRITERS CON

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